Year 7 Schemes of Work: Citizenship

This page includes Year 7 schemes of work on:

  • Introduction to Citizenship.
  • You and Your Community.
  • Political Parties.
  • Education, Rights and Responsibilities.

These comprehensive schemes of work include lesson plans and handouts for every lesson. Each lesson consists of aims, objectives activities and resources. Each scheme of work also includes:

  • Aims and objectives of the unit.
  • Links to the  2013 National Curriculum for Citizenship.
  • Concepts, processes and range and content.
  • Citizenship Formative Statement.
  • Citizenship levels (which can be adapted for your school).
  • Formal Assessment.
  • Possible Classroom Activities.

Introduction to Citizenship.

This is an 8 lesson scheme of work. The unit introduces some of the factors which make up Britain, for example democracy, communities, rights, responsibilities, fairness, participation and discussion. Students are given the chance to write to the school council and are assessed on their ability to show two sides to a debate.

You and Your Community.

The aim of this 6 lesson scheme of work is for students to look at the issues concerning their community, finding out how they can make a change and becoming active citizens. Students learn about the services and facilities the local council gives them. They conduct a questionnaire regarding local safety, services and facilities and write up their findings and send a letter with recommendations for improvements to the local council.

Political Parties.

The aim of this 6 lesson scheme of work is to teach students how power is shared in Britain and how political work to win elections parties. Students work in groups to form political parties and hold a class election, focusing on  school issues.The ideas from the manifestos will be sent to the school council. The unit also aims to give students the chance to communicate with their local MP and visit parliament.

Education, Rights and Responsibilities.

The aim of this 5 lesson scheme of work is to give students the chance to study their right and responsibilities: from education,to wider rights and responsibilities for British Citizens. Students learn about Government policies and laws in Britain and respond to them. Students are given the chance to respond to real life sources and consider opinions that aren’t their own, via class debates.

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Year 8 Schemes of Work: Citizenship

This page includes Year 8 schemes of work on:

  • Local Council Free Swimming.
  • Employment.
  • Moral Courage.
  • The Voluntary Sector.

These comprehensive schemes of work include lesson plans and handouts for every lesson. Each lesson consists of aims, objectives activities and resources. Each scheme of work also includes:

  • Aims and objectives of the unit.
  • Links to the 2013 National Curriculum for Citizenship.
  • Concepts, processes and range and content.
  • Citizenship Formative Statement.
  • Citizenship levels (which can be adapted for your school).
  • Formal Assessment.
  • Possible Classroom Activities.

Local Council Free Swimming.

The aim of this 4 lesson scheme of work is to teach students about the provisions provided by the local council. Students will learn about the benefits of swimming and start to consider whether the local council should make it free or not, using a newspaper as a source. Students will decide how the local council should spend its tax, looking at the variety of departments that want money.

Employment.

The aim of this 5 lesson scheme of work is for students to understand the law regarding children and jobs, and the types of work they are and are not allowed to do. Students students to learn their rights and responsibilities regarding employment and how solve conflict in the workplace.

Moral Courage.

The aims of his 10 lesson scheme of work is, through studying real life situations, to help students recognise and emulate acts of moral courage, to focus student’s attention on the value of moral behaviour in everyday lives to themselves and society and to think critically about the choices they make in life.

The Voluntary Sector.

The aim of this 6 lesson scheme of work is for students to research the work of voluntary groups, looking at how and why voluntary groups work.Students investigate a charity/voluntary organisation, developing research skills. Students are encouraged to get information from charities/voluntary groups–developing their understanding of the work of a voluntary group, and how they can get involved.

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Year 9 Schemes of Work: Citizenship.

This page includes Year 9 schemes of work on:

  • Charity week.
  • Recycling.
  • A New Sports Centre.
  • A New Community.
  • Cycling law

These comprehensive schemes of work include lesson plans and handouts for every lesson. Each lesson consists of aims, objectives activities and resources. Each scheme of work also includes:

  • Aims and objectives of the unit.
  • Links to the 2013 National Curriculum for Citizenship.
  • Concepts, processes and range and content.
  • Citizenship Formative Statement.
  • Citizenship levels (which can be adapted for your school).
  • Formal Assessment.
  • Possible Classroom Activities.

Charity Week.

The aim of this scheme of work is for students to become active citizens and run a charity week at school. The students will decide the charity, design money raising activities, design and distribute adverts speak in assemblies, run the events, collect money and write the event up in the school newsletter. The unit will enhance the pupils’ knowledge of the voluntary sector, looking at why charities work and how they raise money.

Recycling

The aim of this 4 lesson scheme of work is to highlight the problem of global warming and the importance of recycling. The scheme of work aims to show local solutions to the problem, such as local recycling schemes and uses a local newspaper to show that local people who recycle incorrectly are liable to a fine. Students are encouraged to respond to this issue. The scheme of work require students to research global warming and recycling and create a piece of work that will highlight the issue around the school. Students will learn the importance of taking action to fight against problems and are encouraged to share their opinions, and the opinions of their family.

A New Sports Centre.

The aim of this 7 lesson scheme of work is for students to look at the benefits of leisure on the individual and on the local community and to understand how decisions are made locally. The topic teaches students that different people in the same community can have different needs and wants and there are a variety of viewpoints on local issues. Students are given an outline of the difference between private and public companies and their roles in running leisure centres and the controversies that can arise in planning them. Students must then role-play a public meeting, which is discussing whether a new sports centre should be allowed in the town of Shenwood.

The aim of this scheme of work is to allow students to decide how a community should be run. Students study rights and responsibilities and consider what to do when they clash, making informed decisions and judgements. The scheme of work introduces to the benefits and disadvantages of using democracy and autocracy when making rules and laws in society.

Cycling Law.

The aim of this 6 lesson scheme of work is for students to become active citizens and run a charity week at school. The students will decide the charity, design money raising activities, design and distribute adverts speak in assemblies, run the events, collect money and write the event up in the school newsletter. The unit will enhance the pupils’ knowledge of the voluntary sector, looking at why charities work and how they raise money.

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Human Rights: GCSE Citizenship

Below are 28 lessons that I have created and used to teach Human Rights for GCSE Citizenship.

The lessons can be taught as stand-alone lessons or lessons within a Human Rights scheme of work, which, if they are, are designed to be taught in the order they appear below.

Each lesson contains:

  • Aims
  • Objectives
  • Learning Activities
  • Resources.

Lesson contents:

  • What are Human Rights?: 2 lessons
  • Which rights do we want?: 1 lesson
  • When rights clash: 2 lessons
  • Rights versus responsibilities: 3 lessons
  • Burma: 2 lessons
  • Discrimination: 6 lessons
  • Discrimination in Japan: 2 lessons
  • Discrimination assessment: 1 lesson
  • Legal Rights: 2 lessons
  • Vote at 16? Oral assessment: 3 lessons
  • Mock Parliament debate: 1 lesson
  • Amnesty International: 3 lessons

Some of the lesson activities refer to pages in the Collins Edexcel GCSE textbook ‘Citizenship Today’ by Jenny Wales.

 

Lessons 1-2: What are Human Rights?

Aim. To understand the development of Human Rights and how they affect us.

 

Lesson 3: Which Rights Do We Want?

Aim: To hold a debate on the most important human rights.

 

Lessons 4-5: When Rights Clash.

Aim: To hold a debate discussing who should have the final say over rights.

 

Lessons 6-8: Rights versus Responsibilities.

Aim. To decide on which action to take when rights clash.

 

Lessons 9-10 Burma.

Aims: To investigate Human Rights issues in Burma.

To explore how Ben Hammond has raised money and awareness to highlight the issues.

To complete an investigation assessment based on Burma.

 

Lessons 11-16: Discrimination.

Aim: To examine who suffers from discrimination and investigate how it can be stopped: law or education.

 

Lesson 17-18: Discrimination in Japan.

Aim: To find examples of discrimination in Japan and suggest solutions.

 

Lesson 19: Discrimination Assessment.

Aim: To write two essays on different ways to eradicate discrimination, showing two sides to each issues with reasons and opinions.

 

Lesson 20-21: Legal Rights.

Aim: To find out how the law protects Human Rights and the age we receive certain legal rights.

 

Lessons 22-24: Votes at 16? An Oral Assessment.

Aim: To look at two sides and hold a debate on whether the age of voting should be reduced to 16.

 

Lesson 25: Mock Parliament Debate.

Aim: To debate a change in Legal rights.

 

Lesson 26-28: Amnesty International.

Aim. To raise awareness of the issues tackled by Amnesty International through a presentation.

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Politics: GCSE Citizenship

Below are 28 lessons that I have created and used to teach Politics for GCSE Citizenship. They can also be used for a non-GCSE Key stage 4 programme.

The lessons can be taught as stand-alone lessons or lessons within a Politics scheme of work, which, if they are, are designed to be taught in the order they appear below.

Each lesson contains:

  • Aims
  • Objectives
  • Resources (the handouts are underneath the learning activities).
  • Learning Activities

Lesson contents:

  • What does politics have to do with me?: 2 lessons.
  • How can we make a change?: 1 lesson.
  • Getting elected: 2 lessons.
  • Should we bother voting?: 1 lesson.
  • What happens if you get elected? 1 lesson.
  • An in-school election campaign: 10 lessons.
  • Tax and budgets: 2 lessons.
  • Pressure groups: 1 lesson.
  • Student protest: 2 lessons.
  • Comparative political systems: 3 lessons.
  • Democracy versus autocracy: 3 lessons.

Some of the lesson activities refer to pages in the Collins Edexcel GCSE textbook ‘Citizenship Today’ by Jenny Wales.

Lessons 1-2: What Does Politics Have To Do With Me?

Aim: To understand the different ways politics affects our lives.

 

Lesson 3: How Can We Make a Change?

Aim. To rank the best ways to make a change in society.

 

Lesson 4-5: Getting Elected.

Aim: To find out how and why an MP gets elected.

 

Lesson 6: Should We Bother Voting?

Aim: To use a card sort to comment on the pros and cons of voting.

 

Lesson 7: What Happens If You Get Elected?

Aim: To find out the responsibilities MPs have.

 

Lessons 8-17: An In-School Election Campaign.

Aims: To respond to school issues.

To create a political party and win an election.

To give reasons for your ideas, and advising others.

To form a political party, creating a manifesto, speech, leaflet, name and slogan.

To present our work, hold an election and peer and self-assess each group.

 

Lessons 18-19: Tax and Budgets.

Aim: To decide how tax should be spent within government departments.

 

Lesson 20: Pressure Groups.

Aim: To look at the pros and cons of different types of protest.

 

Lesson 21-22: Student Protest.

Aim: To hold a debate on whether / how students should protest.

 

Lesson 23-25 Comparative Political Systems.

Aim: To create a booklet comparing the UK political system with another country.

 

Lesson 26-28: Democracy Versus Autocracy.

Aim. To find the key elements of democracy and autocracy and apply them to school life.

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Global Village: GCSE Citizenship

Below are 16 lessons that I have created and used to teach Human Rights for GCSE Citizenship. They can also be used for a non-GCSE Key stage 4 programme.

The lessons can be taught as stand-alone lessons or lessons within a Politics scheme of work, which, if they are, are designed to be taught in the order they appear below.

Each lesson contains:

  • Aims.
  • Objectives.
  • Resources (the handouts are underneath the learning activities).
  • Learning Activities.

Lesson contents:

  • Introduction: 1 lesson.
  • Global warming: 2 lessons.
  • Raising awareness of global warming: 3 lessons.
  • Sustainable Development: 1 lesson.
  • Globalisation: 2 lessons.
  • Sweatshops: 1 lesson.
  • LEDC debt: 2 lessons.
  • The United Nations: 2 lessons.

Some of the lesson activities refer to pages in the Collins Edexcel GCSE textbook ‘Citizenship Today’ by Jenny Wales.

Lesson 1: Introduction.

Aim. To learn prior knowledge peers have on the unit question and topics to be studied.

 

Lesson 2-3 Global Warming.

Aim. To find out the causes and consequences of Global Warming as research to teach others.

 

Lesson 4-6 Raising Awareness of Global Warming.

Aim. To educate our peers on the importance of, and how to, recycle.

 

Lesson 7: Sustainable Development.

Aim. To find a solution to the world’s energy problems.

 

Lessons 8-9: Sustainable Tourism.

Aim. To solve tourism problems in Kamakura, Japan using sustainable development.

 

Lessons 10-11: Globalisation.

Aim: To look at the pros and cons of Globalisation and its effect on our lives.

 

Lesson 12: Sweatshops.

Aim: To understand the conditions of sweatshops and debate whether to boycott companies who use them.

 

Lessons 13-14: LEDC Debt.

To compare LEDCs with MEDCs and to decide whether LEDC debt should be cancelled.

 

Lessons 15-16: The United Nations.

Aim. To research, inform and learn about the main parts of the UN and The UK’s role in it.

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Active Citizenship Ideas

The following activities are examples of Active Citizenship tasks I have undertaken at my school. They can be done in classes, select groups or whole year/school groups.

1)    Letters to the school council.

I got my students to write to the school council on a variety of issues, from nominating school charities to support and suggesting activities, to making changes to the school environment and uniform. Issues can be discussed and voted on in class, with a selection of the letters presented to the student council.

2)    MP visit to school.

We invited our MP to the school on a yearly basis. Our year 7 students prepared questions beforehand and took part in a one hour question and answer session which included the MP giving an overview of his role. Communications were opened up with the MP so writing to him could be part a unit of work—responses were always well received.

3)    Recycle project.

I worked with students from each year group to highlight the importance of recycling in the school. The students researched global warming, its effects and what can be done about it and exchanged ideas with the school council leading to recycling weeks.

4)    Police visits.

As part of the year 8 unit on crime we invited the local police officers into school. The students prepared question for the police, who also gave a talk on their role and how to stay safe, this led to the setting up of an action group with them

5)    Local police action group

I worked with the local police to create a group of students who joined in with a police initiative to listen to the voices of young people in the area.  The students took part in out of school meetings with the local police and local councillors to express their views on local issues.

6)    School Student’s Charter.

I worked with the local police to create a Student’s Charter. I created a group of year 9 students who wrote a questionnaire and went round all the form rooms in the school. The year 9s amalgamated the information and put it into pie charts and graphs and wrote a summary of their findings. The final report was given to the police who promised to act on the views obtained.

7)    Safety booklet.

We worked alongside the local police to produce a booklet on how to stay safe, from safety at night to internet safety. The police gave a session on safety and the students created a booklet from the information given to them and other facts found from leaflets and the internet. The finished booklet was checked by the police and given out to students at school.

8)    Japan Pen pal Letters.

I got in contact with a school in Japan (Where I used to live and teach). I worked with my year 9 students to create a pen pal scheme. The students were paired up and share letters, comparing and contrasting the British and Japanese cultures. I created a wall display to celebrate the event and used the information gathered from the Japanese students for future work on the United Nation.

9)    Highlight issues

I got students to create information packs / poster on contemporary issues. I photocopied the best work and handed it out to every form tutor who, where possible, put them up in their form rooms.

10)  Care home visit.

A group of year 10 students visited the local elderly care home. They firstly contacted the home’s manager to discuss their requirements and then planned an afternoon’s activities. The aim of the event was to build better communication/relationship between people who lived in the home and our school’s students. The year 10 students successfully broke down barriers by talking about and listening to the different experiences and ideas of each generation.

11) Visit/teach in primary schools on life at our school.

I got students to give assemblies and teach at the local primary schools on a variety of issues such as life at our school, the laws on drugs and alcohol, The effects of healthy eating on the local community and the importance of looking after the local environment.

12) Quiz for local schools. In our school and at theirs.

Year 9 students planned quizzes for local primary schools. These quizzes were held both at our school, where each primary school sent a team, and at one of the local schools, who split a year group into teams. Our year 9 students split themselves up into teams and each took control of a round. Each round was on a different topic, for example, music, television, current affairs, brainteasers and activities such as bush tucker trials. The students created all the questions, usually using ICT, explained the rules of each round, took charge of marking each round, and presented the prizes. The quizzes were aimed at year 6 students and gave them a chance to build up relationships with students at our school and when possible, visit the school to gain experience of the working environment at a secondary school.

13) Charity fund raisers.

My students took part in a variety of fund raisers. My year 9 scheme of work describes in detail the events we took part in during Children In Need Charity Week. I also got students to arrange non uniform and wacky tie days to raise money for a variety of charities and respond to issues such as the Haiti earthquake. Students advertised the events, creating posters and visiting form rooms and assemblies. It was also the students’ responsibility to write about the events in the school newsletters.

14) Assemblies

The year 10s and year 11s held assemblies on a variety of Citizenship issues. Time was given in lessons to prepare the assemblies, which were on contemporary issues such as Black History Month, Children in Need, Remembrance Sunday and Divali.

15) Write to the local council and local newspaper.

I got students to respond to local issues by writing to the local council and local newspaper. This gave students a sense of empowerment when studying local news.

16) Local Radio.

I got students from each year group to work with our local radio show. On one occasion a pupil from each year group took part in a question and answer session with the local MP. This was broadcast on the local radio and the school obtained CD’s from the show.

17) Questions for candidates for senior prefect team.

My Citizenship students worked as part of the school council to interview students who wanted to be part of the following year’s senior prefect team.

18) Havering Youth Council and Havering Youth Parliament—the election/workshop.

I held annual elections to elect students to represent the school at the Havering Youth Council and Youth Parliament. Interested students created manifestos and read speeches. The success candidates went to workshops and took part in Youth Council and Parliament meetings.

19) Teaching lessons.

My citizenship students, in groups of 4 taught lessons to other students in the school. They chose a part of the Citizenship curriculum that appealed to them and created a 1 hour lesson. I supported them in planning their lesson and gave them ideas for activities. They usually taught to younger students. Typical topics that have been taught in my school are the law on gun, drugs, alcohol, the importance of sustainable development, a reaction to a local protest march, highlighting the importance of chosen charities and the work of the local council.

20) Writing in School newsletters.

All of the Active Citizenship activated were written about by students in the school’s newsletters.

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