Introduction and Subject Choice Process

This document explains how the Extended Essay is introduced to students and the subject choice process they go through when choosing their Extended Essay subject.

The document covers the following:

  1. Initial Meeting.
  2. Research workshops.
  3. Extended Essay lunch.
  4. Extended Essay Teacher advice.
  5. The subject choice criteria explanation to the students.
  6. The appeal process.
  7. Writing a proposal.
  8. Contract signing.

PAID MEMBERS CAN DOWNLOAD THE SUBJECT CHOICE PROCESS DOCUMENT

If you are a member you can download the document below. If you have not yet become a member, please do so today in order to be able to gain access to all 350+ resources on this website.

Academic Appeals Form

Below is the Academic Appeals Form that students and teachers use in my school when the student has been advised not to undertake an Extended Essay in a subject based on their academic performance in the said subject in the pre-IBDP course that they undertook, such as The Middle Years Programme or GCSEs.

Similar to the Language Appeals Form, this form asks the student to give a detailed explanation as to why they should be able to write the Extended Essay in the subject, focusing on future career choices, their interest in the subject and / or research area, their existing knowledge in the subject / research are and their recent performance in the subject.

It goes on to ask the student to put in a detailed proposal for the essay, similar to the student proposal form, including possible research questions and how they intend to tackle the research.

After the student has filled in their part of the form, the subject teacher is asked to give an evaluation of the student including recent assessment grades, their interest in the subject, their ability to work independently, their attitude and work rate in lessons, their previous response to targets and advice, their ability to access assessment criteria in the subject.

Teachers are asked to comment on the student’s previous inquiry / research based work in the subject. Finally, the teacher asked whether they recommend that the student is allowed to do an Extended Essay in the subject or not.

After the student’s and teacher’ comments, I work with all parties to come to a resolution. If the teacher does not recommend the student does the essay based on their academic performance, I back their decision and work with the student to find a subject better suited to them.

It must be remembered, however, that every student has the right to do the Extended Essay so not all subjects can say “no”. I have had situations where students have had to add to their proposals before the teacher will make a decision.

Final decisions are reported back to parents, including an explanation of the rationale.

If you are a subscriber, you can download the document below. If you have not yet subscribed, please do so today in order to be able to see all of the resources in this website.

PAID MEMBERS CAN DOWNLOAD THE ACADEMIC APPEALS FORM

If you are a member you can download the document below. If you have not yet become a member, please do so today in order to be able to gain access to all 350+ resources on this website.

Language Appeals Form

This document is the academic appeals form that students use in my school when they have been advised not to undertake an Extended Essay in a subject based on their language performance in the subject in the pre-IBDP course that they undertook, such as The Middle Years Programme or GCSEs.

When students wish to write an Extended Essay in their second language, this will usually mean they want to do it in their Group 2, Language Acquisition subject. There are cases however when a student’s mother tongue is different than the language the Diploma is being taught in. In these cases, the student may be wishing to be writing their essay in a Group 1, 3,4,5, or 6 subject.

Similar to the Academic Appeals Form, this language appeal form asks the student to give a detailed explanation as to why they should be able to write the Extended Essay in the language they have chosen, focusing on future career choices, their interest in the language, subject and/or research area, their existing knowledge in the language, subject/research area and their recent performance them.

It goes on to ask the student to put in a detailed proposal for the essay, similar to the student proposal form, including possible research questions and how they intend to tackle the research.

After the student has filled in their part of the form, the student’s language teacher is asked to give an evaluation of the student including recent assessment grades, their ability to work independently, their reading ability, their writing ability, relevant exam results in the target language, comments on previous essays, their ability to research and write in the target language, their interest in the subject/language, their attitude and work rate, their previous responses to targets and advice, their ability to access criteria, comments on the student’s previous inquiry / research-based work, and a response to the student`s proposal.

If the student is doing the essay in a non-Group 2 subject that is in their second language, the form is passed on to their subject teacher who gives a similar appraisal of the student’s performance from the point of view of the subject, which may or not be affected by their language ability.

After the student’s and teachers’ comments, I work with all parties to come to a resolution. If the teacher(s) do not recommend the student does the essay based on their language ability, I back their decision and work with the student to find a subject better suited to them. In this case, it may be their Group 1 subject, but there are times when a student takes both Group 1 and Group 2 subjects in their second language.

It must be remembered, however, that every student has the right to do the Extended Essay so not all subjects can say “no”. I have had situations where students have had to add to their proposals before the teacher will make a final decision.

Final decisions are reported back to parents, including an explanation of the rationale.

If you are a subscriber, you can download the document below. If you have not yet subscribed, please do so today in order to be able to see all of the resources on this website.

PAID MEMBERS CAN DOWNLOAD THE LANGUAGE APPEALS FORM

If you are a member you can download the document below. If you have not yet become a member, please do so today in order to be able to gain access to all 350+ resources on this website.

Contract

This document is the contract that students sign, agreeing to:

  • Follow the International Baccalaureate`s Academic Honesty Guidelines.
  • Meet my supervisor on a regular basis and keep him/her informed of my progress.
  • Communicate with my supervisor via Managebac.
  • Meet deadlines.
  • Make my supervisor and Diploma Programme Coordinator aware of any problems with completing the essay and / or meeting deadlines.
  • Follow the general and subject specific information given to me in the guides.

If you are a subscriber, you can download the document below. If you have not yet subscribed, please do so today in order to be able to see all of the resources in this website.

PAID MEMBERS CAN DOWNLOAD THE STUDENT CONTRACT

If you are a member you can download the document below. If you have not yet become a member, please do so today in order to be able to gain access to all 350+ resources on this website.

Extended Essay Quiz

This quiz is given to students after they have read the student guide (old guide). Once the answers have been checked and changed, where necessary, it provides a summary of information for the students focusing on:

  • The aims and Objectives of the Essay.
  • The basics of the Extended Essay
  • Advice from the examiners
  • Things to avoid.
  • The student and supervisor
  • The format of the essay.
  • The assessment criteria.

PAID MEMBERS CAN DOWNLOAD THE EXTENDED ESSAY INTRODUCTION QUIZ

If you are a member you can download the document below. If you have not yet become a member, please do so today in order to be able to gain access to all 350+ resources on this website.

Meeting Log

This document is a meeting log to record meetings between the Extended Essay supervisor and student.

The meeting log gives the supervisor the opportunity to record:

  • The progress the student has made against last meeting`s targets:
  • The main issues discussed in the meeting.
  • New targets for the student, with steps to meet them and deadlines.
  • Targets, progress and comments against each assessment criteria.

In the schools that I have worked in, I have encouraged staff to attach the completed logs onto the student’s dashboard on Managebac. This provides clear evidence of the time the supervisor has spent with each student. The notes on these logs can help the students form their ideas for their Reflections on Planning and Progress form (RPPF).

If you are a subscriber, you can download the document below. If you have not yet subscribed, please do so today in order to be able to see all of the resources in this website.

PAID MEMBERS CAN DOWNLOAD THE SUPERVISOR AND STUDENT MEETING LOG

If you are a member you can download the document below. If you have not yet become a member, please do so today in order to be able to gain access to all 350+ resources on this website.

Student Proposal Form

This form is given to students as an initial proposal form.

Students must fill in this Extended Essay proposal form, and give it to the subject teacher. The teacher and DP Coordinator read your proposal and make a decision as to whether it can be used for the student`s Extended Essay.

The students have to consider the following questions before handing in their proposal:

  • What is your research area? Why have you chosen this?
  • What is your research question?
  • What is the significance of the topic and why it is worthy of investigation?
  • What background information do you have on your topic?
  • What will your research methods be? What processes will you go through?
  • What primary sources can you use for your research?
  • What secondary sources can you use for your research?
  • What reading have you found on the topic already?

If you are a subscriber, you can download the document below. If you have not yet subscribed, please do so today in order to be able to see all of the resources in this website.

PAID MEMBERS CAN DOWNLOAD THE STUDENT PROPOSAL FORM

If you are a member you can download the document below. If you have not yet become a member, please do so today in order to be able to gain access to all 350+ resources on this website.

Student Concern Log

As Coordinator, it is important to be kept up to date with any concerns the supervisors have with their student(s). I go through this form with the supervisors at the start of the process and it is filled out by them when they have any worries about their student`s progress.

The completed form can be used to initiate a meeting between the supervisor and Coordinator and the student and, if necessary, their parents. This meeting can be used to put support into action and to set students targets.

It is vital that the supervisors keep the Coordinator well informed regarding any concerns, as student issues need to be sorted out well before the final deadlines set by the school and the International Baccalaureate.

This concern log covers:

  • The area(s) of concern.
  • The support already given by the supervisor.
  • A record of the initial concern meeting– the strategies put into place and targets set.
  • A report on the student`s progress against the targets.
  • A follow up meeting–further action needed.

If you are a subscriber, you can download the document below. If you have not yet subscribed, please do so today in order to be able to see all of the resources in this website.

PAID MEMBERS CAN DOWNLOAD THE STUDENT CONCERN LOG

If you are a member you can download the document below. If you have not yet become a member, please do so today in order to be able to gain access to all 350+ resources on this website.

Subject Specific Information

In order to support students with their subject choice, I worked with each subject to produce information on the following areas of the Extended Essay (old guide).

  • Overview
  • Choice of topic
  • Treatment of topic
  • Subject specifics assessment criteria.

This document is shared with students at the start of the Extended Essay process and is used when students meet teachers from each subject area to discuss potential research areas.

PAID MEMBERS CAN DOWNLOAD THE SUBJECT SPECIFIC INFORMATION DOCUMENT

If you are a member you can download the document below. If you have not yet become a member, please do so today in order to be able to gain access to all 350+ resources on this website.

Supervising your Student

This document is a summary of the ‘Introducing students to the Extended Essay’ part of International Baccalaureate’s Extended Essay website.

I go through this document with supervisors at the Extended Essay Supervisor’s training session at the start of the process. The document is a summary of the whole process and includes example discussion points for the 3 reflection sessions that the supervisors have with their students.

I refer to this document in subsequent meetings with supervisors, highlighting the different parts of the process that they should have reached.

Contents:

  • The supervision process
  • Distinguishing between a supervision session and a reflection session
    a) Check-in sessions b) Formal reflection sessions
  • Supporting the mandatory reflection sessions a) Preparation for the first reflection session b) First formal reflection session c) Preparation for the interim reflection session d) The interim reflection session e) Accommodating a change of direction f) Commenting on a draft version of the extended essay g) Submission requirements h) Preparation for the final reflection session (viva voce) i) Final reflection session (viva voce)
  • Authenticating student work
  • Protocols for completing and submitting the Reflections on planning and progress form

PAID MEMBERS CAN DOWNLOAD THE SUPERVISING YOUR EXTENDED ESSAY STUDENT

If you are a member you can download the document below. If you have not yet become a member, please do so today in order to be able to gain access to all 350+ resources on this website.

Subject Specific Information Task

I created this task for students to complete before their first meeting with their supervisor. The aim of the task is for students to get a clear understanding of the requirements of the Extended Essay in their chosen subject before they meet with their supervisor for the first time.

The information that the students need to complete the tasks can be found in the ‘subject specific guidance’ section of the International Baccalaureate’s Extended Essay website.

I show this document to the Extended Essay supervisors before they meet their students for the first time to show them what the student should know by the time the meeting happens. If a supervisor is new to the Extended Essay it is also good for them to look through the document to give them an overview of the subject specific rules that they will have to be aware of in order to make sure their student is on the right track.

Contents

1. The first part of the document asks the students to look at each subject’s introduction overview, which I put from the website (in each subject’s subject specific guidance part of the website) onto Managebac. If you don’t use Managebac you can either adapt this resource with the links straight to the website or you could save the introduction documents onto your own school’s drive.

The reason I put each subject specific introduction document onto Managebac is so that teachers can find it easily too. From the introduction document the students must summarise:

  • The introduction
  • Topic selection
  • The research question
  • Research methods

2. Students are then directed to the framework of the essay and must summarise

  • Introduction
  • Methods most relevant to subjects in this group
  • Suggestions for possible sources
  • Particular things to be aware of
  • Summary
  • The EE and internal assessments

3. Students are then guided to the website’s subject specific guidance section (using history as an example) and must make notes on the following:

  • Overview
  • Categories (if applicable)
  • Subject specific information / rules
  • Examples of good topics

4. Student must look at how they must treat their topic, focusing on (where applicable):

  • Primary research
  • Secondary research
  • Writing the essay
  • Disciplinary focus
  • Use and analysis of texts
  • General

5. Students must make notes on how the assessment criteria is applied in their subject, focusing on:

  • Criterion A: Focus and Method (Strands: Topic, Research question, Methodology)
  • Criterion B: Knowledge and Understanding (Strands: Context, Subject-specific terminology and concepts)
  • Criterion C: Critical Thinking (Strands: Research, Analysis and Discussion and evaluation)
  • Criterion D: Presentation (Strands: Structure, Layout)
  • Criterion E: Engagement (Strands: Process, Research focus)

PAID MEMBERS CAN DOWNLOAD THE SUBJECT SPECIFIC INFORMATION TASK

If you are a member you can download the document below. If you have not yet become a member, please do so today in order to be able to gain access to all 350+ resources on this website.

Formulating a Research Question

I have created this document to support students in formulating their research question, which is a part of the process that they often find difficult and time consuming.

The document is a summary of the information on the International Baccalaureate’s Extended Essay website

I go through this document with students in the DP Core class and get them to use it in conjunction with the example questions for their subject on the International Baccalaureate’s Extended Essay website.

This document is also shared with the Extended Essay supervisors and I encourage the students to present their draft questions to their supervisor in their first meeting.

The document covers the following:

  • Distinguishing between a title and a research question.
  • Work through the following steps to test your research question.
    • Step 1. Choose your subject area.
    • Step 2. Choose a topic that interests you.
    • Step 3. Suggest a question.
    • Step 4. Evaluate your question.
    • Step 5. Restate your question using a different command term.
    • Step 6. Review with your supervisor.
    • Step 7. Reflection.

PAID MEMBERS CAN DOWNLOAD THE FORMULATING A RESEARCH QUESTION

If you are a member you can download the document below. If you have not yet become a member, please do so today in order to be able to gain access to all 350+ resources on this website.

The Reflections on Planning and Progress Form (RPPF)

Advice for Students

I created this document to help students fill in their Reflections on PLanning and Progress Form, working towards Criterion E “Engagement”, which is worth 6 marks.

The information in this document is a summary of chapter 7 of Hoang P. and Taylor C. 2017. Extended Essay Skills for Success. London Hodder Education.

I share, and go through, this document with students in the DP Core class and refer back to it during the key times in the process, such as when students should be having their reflection sessions with their supervisor, which are then recorded on the Reflections on Planning and Progress Form, which can be found on the International Baccalaureate’s Extended Essay website.

This document is also shared with the Extended Essay supervisors, and is useful for them as it gives example questions and topics they can discuss with their students during their reflection sessions.

This document includes:

  • Introduction.
  • The Reflections on Planning and Progress Form (RPPF).
  • The initial reflection session.
  • The Interim reflection session.
  • The final reflection session: The viva voce.
  • Do’s and don’ts.
  • Where to find assessed and blank RPPFs.

If you are a subscriber, you can download the form below. If you have not yet subscribed, please do so today in order to be able to see all of the resources in this website.

PAID MEMBERS CAN DOWNLOAD THE RPPF ADVICE FOR STUDENTS DOCUMENT

If you are a member you can download the document below. If you have not yet become a member, please do so today in order to be able to gain access to all 350+ resources on this website.

Student Guide (TOK example)

I ask staff to create student guides for their classes based on the official IB subject guides.

The student guides can be given in paper form and / or attached to Managebac (which ensures students can`t lose them).

Below is the student guide I created for my Theory of Knowledge students based on the 2015 subject guide. It gives an overview of the aims, objectives, curriculum and assessment.

I have adapted this student guide from the International Baccalaureate Theory of Knowledge guide. It includes all the students need to know about the curriculum and assessments.

This guide has been used as an example of good practice for teachers and have asked all departments to create one for their subjects, where they must include:

  • aims
  • objectives
  • content
  • assessments
  • rubrics
  • grade descriptors
  • skills needed
  • links to further education and careers

These guides are shown to potential students in year 10 and given to students at the beginning of the course in year 11. They are used to ensure the students have got a clear idea about what is included in the written curriculum for each course in the Diploma Programme, building on the syllabus that they are also given for their subject.

PAID MEMBERS CAN DOWNLOAD THE TOK STUDENT GUIDE

If you are a member you can download the document below. If you have not yet become a member, please do so today in order to be able to gain access to all 350+ resources on this website.

Self-Assessment Checklist

This self-assessment checklist document asks students to assess their progress against the Extended Essay criteria as well as the presentation and structure of the essay.

This document can be given to students at different stages throughout the process. It can be shown to them as they start their essay to give them an idea of what is required. It can also be given to them before they hand in their final rough draft and their finished draft in order to check their progress.

The document asks students to assess themselves against each sub section of the five criterion for the Extended Essay, which are in the form of questions. Each question is formed directly from the wording of the International Baccalaureate’s criteria.

Students have the opportunity to answer “yes”, “no”, or “partly” to each sub section question. If the student answers “yes” to a question, they are then asked to put themselves in the position of the examiner and show where it is evidenced in the essay. If the student answers “no” or “partly”, they are then asked to think about what improvements they need to make to the essay. These improvements can be discussed in a meeting with their supervisor.

The “criteria” tables use the generic criteria for every essay. In order to see how the Extended Essay is applied to the subject the student is writing their essay in, they are advised to go to the “subject specific guidance” section of the International Baccalaureate’s Extended Essay website to see how the criteria is applied for your essay.

As well as for self-assessment, this document can be used for peer-assessment activities, where students can read another student’s essay and give advice on it. It can also be used when looking at the graded anonymous essays in the “assessed student work” part of the International Baccalaureate’s Extended Essay website.

In order to help student get an understanding of what is required for an Extended Essay, they can grade an essay from the website using this document before going over the grade the International Baccalaureate gave it.

Contents:

1. Structure of your Extended Essay.

2. Presentation of the Extended Essay.

3A. Criterion A: Focus and Method.

3B. Criterion B: Knowledge and Understanding.

3C. Criterion C: Critical Thinking.

3D. Criterion D: Presentation.

3E. Criterion E: Engagement.

PAID MEMBERS CAN DOWNLOAD THE SELF-ASSESSMENT CHECKLIST

If you are a member you can download the document below. If you have not yet become a member, please do so today in order to be able to gain access to all 350+ resources on this website.

Join IB Coordinator Today!

IB Coordinator membership programme

Access all the materials on how to set up & sustain IB Programmes;

Lesson plans
✔ Schemes of Work
✔ Reports
✔ Teacher Training
✔ Student Support
✔ Thesis
✔ IB Initiatives
✔ IB Standards Guide
✔ IB Practices Guide

Join today for just £45 and gain instant access to 350 IB resources that have been developed, tried and tested in the classroom!

Join IB Coordinator Today!

IB Coordinator membership programme

Access all the materials on how to set up & sustain IB Programmes;

Lesson plans
✔ Schemes of Work
✔ Reports
✔ Teacher Training
✔ Student Support
✔ Thesis
✔ IB Initiatives
✔ IB Standards Guide
✔ IB Practices Guide

Join today for just £45 and gain instant access to 350 IB resources that have been developed, tried and tested in the classroom!

Join IB Coordinator Today!

IB Coordinator membership programme

Access all the materials on how to set up & sustain IB Programmes;

Lesson plans
✔ Schemes of Work
✔ Reports
✔ Teacher Training
✔ Student Support
✔ Thesis
✔ IB Initiatives
✔ IB Standards Guide
✔ IB Practices Guide

Join today for just £45 and gain instant access to 350 IB resources that have been developed, tried and tested in the classroom!

Join IB Coordinator Today!

IB Coordinator membership programme

Access all the materials on how to set up & sustain IB Programmes;

Lesson plans
✔ Schemes of Work
✔ Reports
✔ Teacher Training
✔ Student Support
✔ Thesis
✔ IB Initiatives
✔ IB Standards Guide
✔ IB Practices Guide

Join today for just £45 and gain instant access to 350 IB resources that have been developed, tried and tested in the classroom!

Join IB Coordinator Today!

IB Coordinator membership programme

Access all the materials on how to set up & sustain IB Programmes;

Lesson plans
✔ Schemes of Work
✔ Reports
✔ Teacher Training
✔ Student Support
✔ Thesis
✔ IB Initiatives
✔ IB Standards Guide
✔ IB Practices Guide

Join today for just £45 and gain instant access to 350 IB resources that have been developed, tried and tested in the classroom!

Join IB Coordinator Today!

IB Coordinator membership programme

Access all the materials on how to set up & sustain IB Programmes;

Lesson plans
✔ Schemes of Work
✔ Reports
✔ Teacher Training
✔ Student Support
✔ Thesis
✔ IB Initiatives
✔ IB Standards Guide
✔ IB Practices Guide

Join today for just £45 and gain instant access to 350 IB resources that have been developed, tried and tested in the classroom!

Join IB Coordinator Today!

IB Coordinator membership programme

Access all the materials on how to set up & sustain IB Programmes;

Lesson plans
✔ Schemes of Work
✔ Reports
✔ Teacher Training
✔ Student Support
✔ Thesis
✔ IB Initiatives
✔ IB Standards Guide
✔ IB Practices Guide

Join today for just £45 and gain instant access to 350 IB resources that have been developed, tried and tested in the classroom!

Want Complimentary IB Resources?

Sign Up & Get Access to Complimentary IB Teaching Resources

IB teaching resources

Simply Complete the Form Below

* indicates required